Is RedKettle right for you?

To answer that question, I'd like to explain my approach to hunting.

Because it forms the basis of how we do things. From running the company. To the way, we obsess about every single detail on a piece of gear.

By the way, I'm Christian Saugmann, and I started RedKettle.

In addition to being an introduction, I hope this page will also give you food for thought on how you approach hunting.

I'll have to warn you. I'll take some detours into areas you won't associate with hunting. And you might think some of my ideas are crazy. That I'm a little mad. But rest assured. There's a method to the madness.

And ultimately, my goal is to help you be more successful as a hunter.

Oh, and by the way, this is a long page. Come back if you're short on time right now. And bring a coffee or another beverage of your choice. Take your time.

Still with me. Cool. Let's get started. Here are a few questions for you.

  • Do you obsess about minute hunting gear details?
  • Do you treasure the silence of the woods or the hills?
  • Do you get excited like a hound, when the hunt is on?
  • Do you long for the big and small adventures hunting gives you?
  • Do you enjoy wild meat you've hunted and cooked yourself?

I do.

To me, hunting is fun, exciting, emotional and rewarding.

But there's also a bigger picture.

I believe hunting is a force of good in nature. When done right.

I think that's an important story to share with the world. Because it will help secure hunting as a lifestyle for you and me. And generations to come.

And it will help us make the right choices when hunting.

Here's the challenge.

Here's the challenge.

Hunting is so much more than hunting.

There are thousands of exciting details we can obsess about.

I'm not sure about you, but I've certainly struggled to explain hunting to non-hunters.

I've also (occasionally) gone down the gear rabbit hole.

Obsessed about details that probably didn't make much of a difference in the bigger scheme of things (that's ok, as long as it's fun, but keeping our purpose in mind is critical for success).

So, how can we sum up all the little details that represent hunting?

How can we explain hunting to non-hunters?

How can we help ourselves stay on the right path as hunters?

My solution is an aspirational identity I call the "steward of nature".

It's the kind of hunter I strive to be. And it helps me sum up things when I talk about hunting.

And as I mentioned above, it's also the character that steers us at RedKettle, as a company.

With RedKettle, I want to inspire hunters to become stewards of nature. So future generations can continue to hunt and eat wild food.

Everything we do is based on this vision.

But what is a steward of nature?

I define a steward of nature as having four roles.

A steward of nature is:

  • A hunter… who acts with a clear purpose and seeks efficiency in all actions.
  • A conservationist… who knows nature is borrowed from their "children."
  • An outdoorsman… who enjoy adventures and take pride in their skills.
  • A cook… who finds beauty in wild food and shares the fruit of their labour.

 

We're defining these roles in more detail. And expanding on a framework to help you master hunting.

Click here to join our list if you'd like us to send you'd like food for thoughts on hunting.